Operationalizing the edge cloud through extensible, multi-domain, fine-grain service chains.



CORD


Transforming Central Offices
Into Datacenters

Learn More


OpenCloud


End-to-End Service Chains in a Multi-Cloud Environment

Learn More

About XOS

XOS is a model-based platform for operationalizing a collection of cloud services. It defines a service control plane that is layered on top of a diverse collection of back-end service implementations, including VM-hosted VNFs, container-based micro-services, and SDN-based control programs that embed functionality in white-box switches. XOS is designed around the principle of Everything-as-a-Services (XaaS), making it an integral part of edge clouds like CORD.

 

XOS provides value along three axes: (1) It supports dynamically extensible systems, not just a single/fixed application. (2) It supports highly disaggregated systems, including conventional micro-services running on servers and control applications programmed into the switching fabric, as well as components distributed across a multi-cloud. (3) It preserves visibility and controllability at the granularity of individual users or flows.

CORD

CORD™ (Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter) is a project intent on transforming the edge of the operator network into an agile service delivery platform. CORD combines SDN, NFV and Cloud technologies it to provide an open, programmable, and agile platform for network operators to create innovative services. CORD provides a complete integrated platform, integrating everything needed to create a complete operational edge datacenter with built-in service capabilities, all built on commodity hardware using the latest in cloud-native design principles.

OpenCloud

OpenCloud supports end-to-end service chains that span edge sites (e.g., CORD) and commodity clouds (e.g., Google Cloud Platform). The goal is to define interfaces and mechanisms needed to deploy functionalityincluding both connectivity services and scalable cloud serviceson behalf of end-users across both edge and centralized clouds. Doing so will provide a means to augment centralized cloud services with a low-latency edge presence, as well as to extend access networks with a customized on-ramp into commodity clouds.

Resources